Simplying Me

staceythinx:

Rosanne de Lang.'s photos of an accidental car graveyard in a forest in Belgium. Many of the cars were left shortly after World War 2.

(Source: sobadsogood.com)

theenergyissue:

Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption

For his series Intolerable Beauty, photographer Chris Jordan peered into shipping ports and industrial yards around America. Though these sites remain unseen by the majority of the population, they hold the stunningly massive remains of our collective consumption. Jordan’s findings include seemingly boundless troves of cell phones, e-waste, circuit boards, cell phone chargers, cars, spent bullet casings, cigarette butts, and steel shred. Jordan describes the immense scale of our detritus as simultaneously “desolate, macabre, oddly comical and ironic, and even darkly beautiful.” Like Edward Burtynsky’s photographs of our vast industrial landscapes, Jordan’s images portray a staggering complexity that verges on the sublime. The photographs reflect the loss of individual identity that results from actions that occur on such a large scale, but Jordan hopes his work can “serve as portals to a kind of cultural self-inquiry” and inspire people to reestablish a personal stake in issues of energy consumption.

ttuzzz:

Top 10 Inspirational And Scary Environmental Quotes WATCH THE VIDEO, CLICK HERE

ttuzzz:

Top 10 Inspirational And Scary Environmental Quotes 
WATCH THE VIDEO, CLICK HERE

Gentrification is a general term for the arrival of wealthier people in an existing urban district, a related increase in rents and property values, and changes in the district’s character and culture. The term is often used negatively, suggesting the displacement of poor communities by rich outsiders. But the effects of gentrification are complex and contradictory, and its real impact varies.

Many aspects of the gentrification process are desirable. Who wouldn’t want to see reduced crime, new investment in buildings and infrastructure, and increased economic activity in their neighborhoods? Unfortunately, the benefits of these changes are often enjoyed disproportionately by the new arrivals, while the established residents find themselves economically and socially marginalized.

Gentrification has been the cause of painful conflict in many American cities, often along racial and economic fault lines. Neighborhood change is often viewed as a miscarriage of social justice, in which wealthy, usually white, newcomers are congratulated for “improving” a neighborhood whose poor, minority residents are displaced by skyrocketing rents and economic change.

PBS (via socio-logic)

(Source: mileysratchetasfuck, via urbnfutr)

unconsumption:

Here’s a skeptical take on “single stream” recycling:


But this process is, ultimately, more expensive than sorting things before they got to the dump, and MRFs can’t separate recyclables quite as well as a system that never mixes them together to begin with. Glass is a particular problem, as the Container Recycling Institute explains:
Glass is the material most affected by the amount of breakage in each type of collection system. In single-stream programs, it is virtually impossible to prevent glass from breaking as it goes to the curb, is dumped in the truck, gets compacted, gets dumped on the tipping floor of the MRF, is repeatedly driven over by forklifts, and is dumped on conveyor belts to be processed by the MRF.
All of this broken glass means that not as much gets recycled—and that sometimes it contaminates other recyclables, like bales of papers. One of the main criticisms of single-stream recycling is that it’s led to a decrease in quality of the materials recovered (which matters for the people who buy bales of recycled material and turn it into new products).

The rest is here: Single-Stream Recycling Is Easier for Consumers, But Is It Better? - The Atlantic

unconsumption:

Here’s a skeptical take on “single stream” recycling:
But this process is, ultimately, more expensive than sorting things before they got to the dump, and MRFs can’t separate recyclables quite as well as a system that never mixes them together to begin with. Glass is a particular problem, as the Container Recycling Institute explains:

Glass is the material most affected by the amount of breakage in each type of collection system. In single-stream programs, it is virtually impossible to prevent glass from breaking as it goes to the curb, is dumped in the truck, gets compacted, gets dumped on the tipping floor of the MRF, is repeatedly driven over by forklifts, and is dumped on conveyor belts to be processed by the MRF.

All of this broken glass means that not as much gets recycled—and that sometimes it contaminates other recyclables, like bales of papers. One of the main criticisms of single-stream recycling is that it’s led to a decrease in quality of the materials recovered (which matters for the people who buy bales of recycled material and turn it into new products).

The rest is here: Single-Stream Recycling Is Easier for Consumers, But Is It Better? - The Atlantic

brucesterling:

*That red stuff is what people still think economic reality is and the gray stuff is the actual reality.  Americans, not even in the contest

brucesterling:

*That red stuff is what people still think economic reality is and the gray stuff is the actual reality.  Americans, not even in the contest

(via secretrepublic)

knowhomo:

Gay Marriage / Same-Sex Marriage Political Cartoons

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All cartoons pulled from Cagle.com

(via political-cartoons)

greenwashed:

Una infografía explicando como la mayoría de eco-productos no hacen absolutamente nada por el medio ambiente

greenwashed:

Una infografía explicando como la mayoría de eco-productos no hacen absolutamente nada por el medio ambiente

(Source: mediaecologyandyou)

humanscalecities:

Qualities of a walkable city
These seven urban qualities have not surprised planners and real estate people in the region. Rather it confirms what is already known that people in Stockholm search for walkability and high quality public space.

humanscalecities:

Qualities of a walkable city

These seven urban qualities have not surprised planners and real estate people in the region. Rather it confirms what is already known that people in Stockholm search for walkability and high quality public space.

(via fuckyeahurbandesign)